Ways to create Regular Expressions in QTP

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In QTP, there are multiple ways to create Regular Expressions. Below are most common 15 different ways to create Regular Expressions:
  1. Using the Backslash Character: A backslash (\) can serve two purposes. It can be used in conjunction with a special character to indicate that the next character be treated as a literal character. For example, \.would be treated as period (.) instead of a wildcard. Alternatively, if the backslash (\) is used in conjunction with some characters that would otherwise be treated as literal characters, such as the letters n, t, w, or d, the combination indicates a special character. For example, \n stands for the newline character.
  2. Matching Any Single Character: A period (.) instructs QTP to search for any single character (except for \n).
  3. Matching Any Single Character in a List: Square brackets instruct QTP to search for any single character within a list of characters.
  4. Matching Any Single Character Not in a List: When a caret (^) is the first character inside square brackets, it instructs QTP to match any character in the list except for the ones specified in the string.
  5. Matching Any Single Character within a Range: To match a single character within a range, you can use square brackets ([ ]) with the hyphen (-) character.
  6. Matching Zero or More Specific Characters: An asterisk (*) instructs QTP to match zero or more occurrences of the preceding character.
  7. Matching One or More Specific Characters: A plus sign (+) instructs QTP to match one or more occurrences of the preceding character.
  8. Matching Zero or One Specific Character: A question mark (?) instructs QTP to match zero or one occurrences of the preceding character.
  9. Grouping Regular Expressions: Parentheses (()) instruct QTP to treat the contained sequence as a unit, just as in mathematics and programming languages. Using groups is especially useful for delimiting the argument(s) to an alternation operator ( | ) or a repetition operator ( * , + , ? , { } ).
  10. Matching One of Several Regular Expressions: A vertical line (|) instructs QTP to match one of a choice of expressions.
  11. Matching the Beginning of a Line: A caret (^) instructs QTP to match the expression only at the start of a line, or after a newline character.
  12. Matching the End of a Line: A dollar sign ($) instructs QTP to match the expression only at the end of a line, or before a newline character.
  13. Matching Any AlphaNumeric Character Including the Underscore: \w instructs QTP to match any alphanumeric character and the underscore (A-Z, a-z, 0-9, _).
  14. Matching Any Non-AlphaNumeric Character: \W instructs QTP to match any character other than alphanumeric characters and underscores.
  15. Combining Regular Expression Operators: You can combine regular expression operators in a single expression to achieve the exact search criteria you need.
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